Kiri Tree

The history of the Kiri tree

In 2009, we first learned about the potential of the Kiri tree. Its special characteristics and performance began to excite us more and more. Driven by curiosity and enthusiasm, we consulted a team of experts with whom we planned our first planting.And so it was that barely six months later, we planted our first Kiri trees on an area of about four hectares. Our expectations were high and were even exceeded. Overwhelmed by the success of our first Kiri tree plantation, we started planting more plantations together with partners. The success of our first plantations attracted more and more attention in our surrounding communities. We got an increasing number of enquiries whether we would not also offer trees for sale and whether there would be possibilities to participate. After several months of research and careful planning, we finally decided to buy another area of 145 hectares and plant it with Kiri trees. The purpose of this plantation is now to offer everyone the opportunity to participate in the incredible potential of the Kiri tree. Thus, we want to make it possible for you to do something good for the environment and at the same time to be able to invest transparently, profitably and above all safely.

Symbolic meaning in China and Japan

Because of its beauty and the imperial majesty of its blossoms, the Kiri tree was assigned as a tree symbol to the Japanese imperial house. The leaves and blossoms of the imperial Kiri tree were therefore used as a heraldic symbol in the imperial coat of arms (Go-Shichi no Kiri). In tree symbolism, the kiri tree is generally regarded as a symbol of fertility and good fortune in China, Japan and Korea because of its extraordinarily high growth rate. The latter goes back to a legend according to which the Japanese imperial tree was the seat of the mystical bird “Phoenix”, which burns and arises anew from its ashes (“like Phoenix from the ashes”). The Phoenix is said to have only settled on a Kiri tree during its flights. But the term Phoenix tree is also used in botany, because the Kiri tree has the property of growing back many times after it has been felled.

Uniqueness of the Kiri tree

The kiri tree is considered the fastest growing tree on earth. If one creates the necessary growth conditions for it, it can grow over five metres in one year and produce as much wood volume as an oak in one tenth of the time. Its girth increases by about 10 – 12 cm per year.

The Kiri tree is also of enormous importance for the climate and the environment. Due to its large leaves, it absorbs significantly more CO2 than most other trees – which is why it is often called the lungs of the cities.

Another advantage over many other trees is that the Kiri tree is very resistant to pests and insects. It is also very adaptable and tolerant of climatic conditions. Because of its many positive characteristics, the Kiri tree is excellently suited for cultivation on plantations. It outperforms all other trees by producing precious wood of very good quality in a much shorter time and at the same time has a noticeable positive effect on the climate, as well as on the air and soil quality.

Kiri tree comparison

In the following we would like to offer you a comparative insight
into the growth performance of the Kiri tree. The data refer to 10-year-old trees.

Yearly C02 absorbation of a Kiri tree

Kiri-Tree: 600kg
Teak: 50kg
Oak: 50kg
Kiri-Tree: 600kg
Teak: 50kg
Oak: 50kg

Average height after 10 years

Kiri-Tree: 20m
Teak: 10m
Oak: 2m
Kiri-Tree: 20m
Teak: 10m
Oak: 2m

Stem diameter after 10 years

Kiri-Tree: 40cm
Teak: 20cm
Oak: 10cm
Kiri-Tree: 40cm
Teak: 20cm
Oak: 10cm

Special properties of Kiri wood

Fast-growing precious wood - that sounds too good to be true for many. The Kiri tree is one of the few trees that creates valuable timber in a short time. The wood has a number of special properties that make it unique compared to all other precious woods.

Flame resistant (flashpoint at 420°C)

Easy to process

Low thermal conductivity
(good temperature isolation)

Low weight with high stability

Good acoustic properties

Fast growth

Dries quickly (resin- and odourless)

Does not deform in wet conditions

Undemanding and Adaptable

Harvest season

Precious wood is a natural raw material, its value comes from the growth of the trees. The longer a tree grows, the more wood it can deliver. The many hours of sunshine and the good soil quality in Southern Europe enable us to harvest very early - after only 8 - 12 years. At this point, each Kiri tree yields about two cubic metres of fine wood of wood quality C.

Timber Grades

  • Wood Quality A
  • Less than 1.0 percent of all Paulownia logs are of this quality: US $ 2966.43 - 3390.20 per m3.

  • Wood Quality B
  • About 40 percent of all Paulownia logs are of this quality: US $ 1695.10 - 2118.88 per m3.

  • Wood Quality C
  • About 40 percent of all Paulownia logs are of this quality: US $ 847.55 - 932.30 per m3.

  • Wood Quality D
  • Logs with more than two defects but at least four annual rings per inch: US $ 375- 400 per m3